Is STABILO the Best Pen for Children?

by The Pen Warrior on August 24, 2009

A good pen for children needs to be comfortable for their small hands, be designed to encourage proper finger placement and hold and be fun to look at and use. There’s no doubt that the ‘move easy’ range from STABILO is all of those things.

The ’s move easy rollerball pen is curved to fit neatly over a child’s hands. The pen also is made with finger grooves that automatically place the fingers in a natural, comfortable hold that helps prevent cramping while still allowing maximum control overn the writing tip.

Stabilo Move Easy

The range is available in several bright colours that children like (we’re partial to the orange and black model). And, with options like blue erasable ink, black ink and red ink for the pens, they’re suited for just about any type of schoolwork.

The ‘move easy’ writes smoothly and evenly, so it takes little pressure to move it over the writing surface, making it, as the name says, easy for a child to use. In fact, we recommend the left-handed version for both children and adults alike.

With all that, it’s easy to believe that the pen, as STABLIO boasts on its website, is “praised by teachers, approved by parents, loved by children.”

So is it the best pen you can buy for your child?

We certainly think it is an excellent choice, and since we carry the STABILO range, we would, of course, like for you to buy the ‘move easy.’ It wouldn’t make sense for us to sell pens that we didn’t believe were of the highest quality and performance.

But there are a few other brands that also make excellent pens for children.

German pen company Lamy produces the ABC, a cartridge fountain pen for children with a rounded, comfortable body made of maple wood and a non-slip rubberized grip. The pens are recommended for their smooth nibs and sturdy construction, capable of withstanding plenty of abuse from schoolkids.

Another German product, Faber-Castell’s Schulfüller und Tintenroller – translates as School Filler and Ink Scooter, according to Babel Fish – is also aimed at children. This is a fountain pen with a contoured “grip zone” that encourages proper finger placement. It uses ink cartridges filled with erasable ink and has “windows” in the barrel to monitor the ink level.

Schulfuller und Tintenroller

Pelikan, yet another German company ( how did the Germans come to so dominate the children’s pen market?), offers what is probably the most serious competition for STABILO.

Pelikan Griffix Fountain Pen

The pen maker markets its writing instruments for children as the griffix learning system. It starts with a wax marker in pre-school, steps up to a mechanical pencil, then to an ink pen and finally to a “state of the art” fountain pen.

According to Pelikan, each of them has:

…a constant distance of the grip area to the tip of the pen, a unified size in diameter and the same length ratio of all writing instruments within the system. Therefore, learning a new holding position when switching to the next step of the system is unnecessary.

The pens are designed, like the STABILO, with indentations in the grip area so that the fingers automatically go to proper positions. They also have a smiley face that points toward the child when the pen is held properly.

Accessories include “fun buttons” that can be affixed to the shaft to customize the pens.

With so much choice, what it comes down to is that it is extremely difficult to name one pen the “best” for children. As you try to decide what kind of pen is best suited to help your child learn to write, it’s important to remember that no single pen works for every child.

The right pen is the one that provides your individual child with the most comfortable writing experience.

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Stabilo Stiften November 7, 2013 at 10:55 AM

Hello what a nice article about stabilo, i sell stabilo markers and i wass wondering if i have the permit to translate your text and put it in our information database?

2 The Pen Warrior December 3, 2013 at 9:27 AM

I would prefer not a direct copy but there is nothing wrong with reading the post and using this information to write your own if that helps.

Leave a Comment

You can use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Previous post:

Next post: